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    All college rugby clubs recognize the importance of having a positive image...both on campus and in the community. An image that shows how great an athletic competition rugby is on the field and how important it can be off the field in developing the character of young adults. 

    NSCRO is committed to preparing these student-athletes for life off the field and post-graduation. Our Leadership Development Program provides these student-athletes with the tools and mentorship to help develop them into future leaders and patrons of their community. 

    The mission of the NSCRO Leadership Development Program (LDP) is to provide student-athletes and coaches who are engaged in small college club rugby guidance in ways to better serve their respective team, college/university and community.  For many athletes in the U.S., their first exposure to rugby is when they arrive on a college campus and somehow connect with the men and women who are playing college club rugby.  As a member of a college rugby club team, players soon discover there is much more to the game than simply showing up for practices and Saturday matches.  There are inherent responsibilities that the student-athlete accepts, such as stepping up and taking charge, either on or off the pitch.  Because of the four-year college cycle, there is constant turnover in club leadership as the seniors graduate each May and the next year’s class steps up.  This four-year progression model creates excellent leadership opportunities for players.  Additionally, coaches play an integral role in the success of any competitive college team and are vital to student-athlete development as well, both on and off the pitch.

    As part of its Leadership Recognition Program, NSCRO will recognize male and female rugby players for their exemplary leadership skills both on the pitch and in leading a community service event. This award is known as the Student-Leader of the Month.   

    For more information about the Leadership Development Program or our Student-Leader Recognition Award, please contact Colonel Tom Trumps (Ret.) who leads NSCRO's Leadership Team.

     

    "Rugby at its core is built around fair play and fierce athletic endeavor. It is from strict adherence to those principles that rugby builds character, and strong character breeds leadership. At the youth through college levels, it is incumbent upon the coaches, administrators, referees and parents to enforce the rugby ethos. Once young men and women are exposed to the sport in its form, they very quickly recognize what it takes to excel.

    I met with a freshmen recruit today and his parents. He has played four (4) years of high school rugby. His parents told me how their son dropped other sports, because of his love of rugby, and how pleased they were with his decision. He studies harder, works better and exhibits better manners and they attribute this to his exposure to rugby. His high school program obviously takes the right approach with young athletes, but they couldn't say enough positive things about the sport.”

    Kurt Murrell, Head Coach of the University of Southern Indiana RFC 

    Leadership Development Team

     

    NSCRO_LD-Team-Tom-Trumps       NSCRO_LD-Team-Tracy-Schrems       NSCRO_LD-Team-Roderick-Bonner

     

    NSCRO_LD-Team-Kurt-Murrell       NSCRO_LD-Team-Mike-Wenzel      

    "Since graduation I have slowly began to realize the effect that Rugby has played in my young adult life.  While playing rugby in college I had the opportunity to work in numerous leadership positions, some forced and others more willingly, but all have made an impact on me in becoming a responsible leader.

    This awesome sport of rugby has taught me a lot, mostly that I wished that I started younger.  By leading a rugby team on and off the field, it’s taught me: time and money management, better motivational and communication skills, self-discipline and the importance of being a team player.  These are all skills that have become extremely useful in my military career and later civilian career."

    Roderick Bonner, a recent graduate of the University of North Georgia